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Question - Top Down Sketch to UE4 Workflow

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    Question - Top Down Sketch to UE4 Workflow

    I am trying to figure out different workflows of working with top-down sketches (multiplayer level layouts) to see what works best for me.

    1) After you create a top down sketch/level layout on paper, how do you work with it in/for UE4?
    2) Could this workflow be improved upon?: create top down sketch> take a picture> upload to PC> import to UE4> set as a texture> apply to geometry> then scale it up until satisfied with the scale> begin to blockout/add geometry on top?
    3) Is there a better/simpler way than having to guesstimate the scale of the image once imported to UE4?
    4) Do you simply work from a top down sketch on paper? (ie. not imported to PC nor UE4?)
    5) Is there some type of functionality in UE4 similar to an Image Plane from Maya?

    Thank you.

    #2
    Originally posted by Yourname942 View Post
    I am trying to figure out different workflows of working with top-down sketches (multiplayer level layouts) to see what works best for me.

    1) After you create a top down sketch/level layout on paper, how do you work with it in/for UE4?
    2) Could this workflow be improved upon?: create top down sketch> take a picture> upload to PC> import to UE4> set as a texture> apply to geometry> then scale it up until satisfied with the scale> begin to blockout/add geometry on top?
    3) Is there a better/simpler way than having to guesstimate the scale of the image once imported to UE4?
    4) Do you simply work from a top down sketch on paper? (ie. not imported to PC nor UE4?)
    5) Is there some type of functionality in UE4 similar to an Image Plane from Maya?

    Thank you.
    1) I don't use them, but from reading and hearing what others have said, I understand to be something they just have at the side and refer back to as a mental prompt.
    2) I'm sure it could, but many would argue it is time which could be better spent projecting dimensions inside the geo tool. It could be argued (and I'm sure others will!) this is the reason why subtractive geometry is more prevalent than additive.
    3) Dimensions and scaling are dependant on the thousands of iterations one makes when building, but having objects in the map like a character/mannequin to gauge how a room feels when PIE'ing are a common way to determine this.
    4) Personally, no - but a lot of peeps do, using anything from a cocktail napkin to excel artwork to plot distances. Dealer's choice, basically and whatever is to hand when inspiration strikes. Adobe have got some nifty apps for tablets which I could see as being used and useful. However, working directly inside the engine, with power-ups and pickups at your disposal is really where areas can be plotted.
    5) Yes - just a plane which you can put any texture on it you want. Once you do that, the engine will create a material for you, which you can then alter any way you wish. There are also options for texture cubes and reflections to toy with.

    In short, there are many ways to further the build process of your map, and it's all decided by you. I would say and add, that just chiselling away in the geo tool is the way to do it - and the community is here to feedback on what you create.

    Put a pot of coffee on and get to it! Procrastinating is not your friend, the delete key is!
    Maps:

    DM-PSi ; DM-Genku ; DM-Untold Storage ; DM-Station (WIP) ; DM-HeatRay Physx (WIP)

    DM/TSD-Formidable (WIP)

    Comment


      #3
      it's a guide, nothing more, nothing less. It'll change when in practice.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Chris.Kay View Post
        it's a guide, nothing more, nothing less. It'll change when in practice.
        That makes sense. I always thought that to be a level designer in the industry, I would have to be able provide "100%-accurately-scaled (proportional)" representations of my levels to others, but it makes sense that it is more of an iterative starting point. (Since it will change with play-testing)

        But does this mean that when concepting out layouts, I should I focus/worry less on the details of exact dimensions/proportions of the level layout, and focus more on the flow/other design principles for the level layout overall? Thank you.
        Last edited by Yourname942; 08-06-2016, 11:18 PM.

        Comment


          #5
          you got it, think of the flow, item placement, spawnpoints, maybe landmarks (for easy area identification) and maybe think a bit about boundaries, it's basically just a starting point so when you go into the editor your not like "erm what do I do now" just a heads up though, it's not even necessary to draw a layout every time, it depends on your workflow, but it can help. The other option is to get dirty in the editor right away, make something extremely rough, and have other level designers look at it for early feedback, which to be honest would happen if you draw a sketch or not in a professional studio

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