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Which to Use UT Editor vs UE4?

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Selentic View Post
    Have either of you done anything relevant to any of the disciplines that go into game development in any sort of significant depth? Read: 1 year + of serious level design experience or 3d art experience, etc? If the answer is no, then you're probably not going to get very far from starting from scratch in ue, or even modding UT. Start with one facet of game development and work out from there. I would personally recommend level design in a simple game such as tf2 or cs, since they have very low barriers of entry, most of the art assets made for you already, and you instantly get to see what you've made as a playable asset.
    He has no experience. I don't know if I would call it "serious" but my friends and I were doing maps for Unreal when it first came out in the late 90s. After a bit of a refresher I'm pretty comfortable making meshes in the game. Making 3D models outside the game and working with textures not so much.

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  • replied
    Have either of you done anything relevant to any of the disciplines that go into game development in any sort of significant depth? Read: 1 year + of serious level design experience or 3d art experience, etc? If the answer is no, then you're probably not going to get very far from starting from scratch in ue, or even modding UT. Start with one facet of game development and work out from there. I would personally recommend level design in a simple game such as tf2 or cs, since they have very low barriers of entry, most of the art assets made for you already, and you instantly get to see what you've made as a playable asset.
    Last edited by Envieous; 05-08-2017, 11:15 PM.

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  • replied
    Thanks for all the thoughts, guys. I completely get that, for the long view, UE is the best place to start. I'm just concerned about the learning curve for him and his motivation level to put in the time to do it. I thought maybe UT Editor would be a good way to whet his appetite maybe. What do you think of using the UT Editor as kind of an intro platform? Or is it just as easy to get the same output with the same level of work in UE?

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  • replied
    UE4. Blueprints.
    The ebooks of this
    https://forums.unrealengine.com/show...e-4-2-UMG-More!

    i swear by them. start with #1
    might be a little outdated. But it got me to a point of creating pretty advanced stuff with blueprints

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  • replied
    To be fair, Data also said...

    https://31.media.tumblr.com/5de97e9c...opl1ryw5qc.jpg

    Edit: just saw the misprint in the img and nearly choked on my ginger drink.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Mondogrunday View Post
    Mitch provides solid wisdom in this area. I was in a similar predicament the other day. I chose unreal engine and learned a great deal about making lifts, jump pads etc, but since my map was for unreal tournament I required some elements of the software that were not included such as weapons and pickups exclusive to unreal tournament. I built my map again in unreal editor and thus was able to include all the ut stuff i required. for your son, unreal engine is definitely the way to go. it has plenty more options when creating things and your son will learn a great deal more from it. there is a boatload of tutorials and documentation online to assist him. it is a bit time consuming to learn as you go, but it is rewarding.
    Originally posted by Lao Tzu

    "The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step."

    Originally posted by Lt. Cmdr. Data

    "Captain, the most elementary and valuable statement in science, the beginning of wisdom, is; 'I do not know'."

    Originally posted by Orsen Welles

    “I didn’t know what you couldn’t do. I didn’t deliberately set out to invent anything. It just seemed to me, why not? And there is a great gift that ignorance has to bring to anything. That was the gift I brought to Citizen Kane, ignorance.”
    Just some random wisdom I have learnt to appreciate more over the years. Perhaps this will mean something to you, perhaps not. I hope it will, I believe it does.

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  • replied
    Mitch provides solid wisdom in this area. I was in a similar predicament the other day. I chose unreal engine and learned a great deal about making lifts, jump pads etc, but since my map was for unreal tournament I required some elements of the software that were not included such as weapons and pickups exclusive to unreal tournament. I built my map again in unreal editor and thus was able to include all the ut stuff i required. for your son, unreal engine is definitely the way to go. it has plenty more options when creating things and your son will learn a great deal more from it. there is a boatload of tutorials and documentation online to assist him. it is a bit time consuming to learn as you go, but it is rewarding.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Breetye View Post
    HI all,

    My son is interested in computer science and game development. I used to do maps in the original Unreal and then Unreal Tournament and it was pretty easy to do basic stuff (I suck at artwork and textures though).

    We worked out a concept that is a FPS but doesn't visually look anything like UT. All the weapons have to be modded, all the playable characters have to be modded, etc. Just for us to get started would it be easier to start with UT and just modify it's assets? Or should we start with UE4? He has zero coding experience. I do some VB.NET at work, but it's for business applications and nothing with graphics

    Thanks!
    Hi y'self,

    Let me give you an honest appraisal of your position and question, purely from an armchair perspective, in front of a warm fire with a brandy...

    Your place to start is UE4, using the starter content and the 'first person shooter game' content - this will literally give you everything you need to start you on the journey to become millionaires.

    The thing to realise is the Blueprint system - this is ultimately the thing that requires your biggest attention. It is with this system that an FPS game, fully complete, can be driven from and once harnessed will get you in the right position to placing that Ferrari order, with cream leather.

    If you have not looked at the Blueprint system, may I recommend taking a look at this: https://docs.unrealengine.com/latest...Dco/index.html

    In short, the Unreal Tournament 4 engine, is basically, an Unreal Engine Project - nothing more. If anything, it is more restrictive and does not allow the usage of plugins outside of the licence provided for UT4. Your development will be hindered by using it, making that Rolex order be delayed even longer than desired.

    From your son's perspective, being that computer science is a broad topic, again; you will be better poised by using UE4.

    /out

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  • started a topic Which to Use UT Editor vs UE4?

    Which to Use UT Editor vs UE4?

    HI all,

    My son is interested in computer science and game development. I used to do maps in the original Unreal and then Unreal Tournament and it was pretty easy to do basic stuff (I suck at artwork and textures though).

    We worked out a concept that is a FPS but doesn't visually look anything like UT. All the weapons have to be modded, all the playable characters have to be modded, etc. Just for us to get started would it be easier to start with UT and just modify it's assets? Or should we start with UE4? He has zero coding experience. I do some VB.NET at work, but it's for business applications and nothing with graphics

    Thanks!
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