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    Tips and tricks UTeditor

    Post all your tips n tricks for making ut maps, to go faster or make better stuff etc. .
    beginners to advanced

    going to try and sort everything in this OP.
    Last edited by skeevn; 03-30-2015, 03:59 PM.
    ut4 @ ESL
    skeevn: The A-side frags [fragmovie]
    usefull jumps for beginners and advanced
    skeevn 2v2 ictf mappack

    The only *** playing with arrowkeys since '95

    #2
    To add ambient and brighten up dark areas you can tweak "ambient cubemap intensity" on your post process volume. I think this is intended as a short term thing before lighting is setup but it has been useful to me.

    Posts are about duel unless otherwise specified. ut duel shortcomings | What is timing? | dm-twentyseven

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      #3
      I've been trying to work out how to do that! Thanks man!



      Originally posted by joellll View Post
      To add ambient and brighten up dark areas you can tweak "ambient cubemap intensity" on your post process volume. I think this is intended as a short term thing before lighting is setup but it has been useful to me.

      Win 10
      iMac (27-inch, Late 2013)
      3.5 GHz Intel Core i7
      32 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
      NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780M 4096 MB

      Maps:
      DM-RadioActive (Work In progress) DM-Ethos (WIP) DM-QWERTY (WIP) DM-TwinFalls(WIP)
      2k4 DM-MoonGames, DM-Abrenabba, DM-Aphelion, DM-Pyrimid-Of-Gold, DM-UPH-Hexed, Dm-Saint, DM-LethalAdixion, DM-C4-Ariza, Dm-C4-SleepyTomb,

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        #4
        Anyone knows how to replace one material with another on a multiple surfaces?
        I tried to select all surfaces with the same material, but the material change only applies to a single originally-selected face.

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          #5
          YES:

          Select the surface containing the Texture/materiel. And then on the right hand side select, Geometry,Select,All matching material . They drag and drop the materiel/texture you would like to replace it with.

          Sorry I can't take a screenshot.. I'm using windows 7 on my mac and have no idea how to screen shot anything lol..

          Originally posted by ShurikMur View Post
          Anyone knows how to replace one material with another on a multiple surfaces?
          I tried to select all surfaces with the same material, but the material change only applies to a single originally-selected face.
          Win 10
          iMac (27-inch, Late 2013)
          3.5 GHz Intel Core i7
          32 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
          NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780M 4096 MB

          Maps:
          DM-RadioActive (Work In progress) DM-Ethos (WIP) DM-QWERTY (WIP) DM-TwinFalls(WIP)
          2k4 DM-MoonGames, DM-Abrenabba, DM-Aphelion, DM-Pyrimid-Of-Gold, DM-UPH-Hexed, Dm-Saint, DM-LethalAdixion, DM-C4-Ariza, Dm-C4-SleepyTomb,

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by ShurikMur View Post
            Anyone knows how to replace one material with another on a multiple surfaces?
            I tried to select all surfaces with the same material, but the material change only applies to a single originally-selected face.
            Also, try Shift-T. It's so danged easy to do it that way and has been a real lifesaver for me.
            UT4 CTF Maps: CTF-Whiplash | CTF-Sidewinder | CTF-Highpoint | CTF-Hardcore | CTF-Tubes-Of-Spam

            UT99 CTF Maps: CTF-DagnysBigAssMap-V2 | CTF-Dagnys-P****WhIpPeD | CTF-Dagnys-Dark-Delight-LE102 | CTF-Dagnys-Tubes-Of-Spam

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by effects69 View Post
              YES:
              ...Select,All matching material . They drag and drop the materiel/texture ...
              The catch is - it didn't work, it only replaces only material on a one surface i select first. The UT editor is up to date.

              Comment


                #8
                I wish I could take a screenshot to show you, I just have no idea how to do so, I'm using a mac keyboard on a windows OS.

                Originally posted by ShurikMur View Post
                The catch is - it didn't work, it only replaces only material on a one surface i select first. The UT editor is up to date.
                Win 10
                iMac (27-inch, Late 2013)
                3.5 GHz Intel Core i7
                32 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
                NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780M 4096 MB

                Maps:
                DM-RadioActive (Work In progress) DM-Ethos (WIP) DM-QWERTY (WIP) DM-TwinFalls(WIP)
                2k4 DM-MoonGames, DM-Abrenabba, DM-Aphelion, DM-Pyrimid-Of-Gold, DM-UPH-Hexed, Dm-Saint, DM-LethalAdixion, DM-C4-Ariza, Dm-C4-SleepyTomb,

                Comment


                  #9
                  I knew that option (how to select all surf. with same material) - it selects, but the new material only applies to one face, not all of them. I drag it to the "datails" panel, not on a 3d view.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    select all your materials in place mode (shift+1 to go into actor place mode), (shift+T for all the same material), select your new material, hold shift and click on one of your select faces. this will aply the material to all selected faces (can also be used on single faces)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      This is probably stoopidly basic, but I spent way too much time returning to an orthographic view and clicking blank space so maybe it will help someone else: Press ESC to deselect everything/anything you have selected.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Buy an extra monitor
                        ON-GOING PROJECTS: DM-BloodCovenant, DM-Campgrounds (Absolute)
                        CONTACT & TWITCH: Absolute Discord
                        , Twitch

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                          #13
                          Reviving this one

                          I found this useful when I was starting a completely new map and did not want to worry about texturing yet. Enable one or both of the following:

                          Show > Advanced > BSP Split
                          Show > Advanced > Mesh Edges

                          This Image Was Automatically Resized by using the Screenshot Tag.  Click to view the full version

                          Split will color surfaces different colors and mesh edges will highlight the edges of the triangulated BSP brush. If I don't use this my brushes are all the same texture and it all blends together.

                          View Mode > Player Collision (instead of Lit) can also achieve the same goal.
                          DM-Nine | CTF-HolyOak

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by tidu View Post
                            Reviving this one

                            I found this useful when I was starting a completely new map and did not want to worry about texturing yet. Enable one or both of the following:

                            Show > Advanced > BSP Split
                            Show > Advanced > Mesh Edges

                            This Image Was Automatically Resized by using the Screenshot Tag.  Click to view the full version

                            Split will color surfaces different colors and mesh edges will highlight the edges of the triangulated BSP brush. If I don't use this my brushes are all the same texture and it all blends together.

                            View Mode > Player Collision (instead of Lit) can also achieve the same goal.
                            Good suggestion, but simply building the map bsp and lighting once (which takes typically a minute or less on a bsp shell) will show the map with enough depth to differentiate each surface regardless of material.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I actually started writing some random LD "tips" a while ago on a note pad right about the time I was working on Chill. My intention was to eventually write some kind of document/tutorial that might help explain some of the nuances of Level design, especially in Unreal. These are just a couple of the many notes I have, unedited. I'm not great at writing so I apologise in advance for my terrible grammar and writing style! Hopefully I can get around to finishing it up and making it more usable but I figured I'd throw some of them up here for you guys. I'm currently not assigned to the UT team (I'm working on Fortnite) so I usually try to do UT stuff in my free time (because I love UT) and that's why this stuff and the maps I'm working on can sometimes take a bit longer!

                              1. Make sure your grid is on at all times. When starting a shell make sure you work at a higher grid size for blocking out, if you start getting too low in grid size, you're probably getting too detailed. I personally work at a 50 unit grid size, occasionally bumping down to 25 for certain angles/measurements and minor things like stairs etc. Some people even stick to the 100 unit grid while sometimes moving down to 50. The key is to think broader strokes. You could make the most pretty and intricate BSP room in Unreal Tournament, but if it doesn't flow and fit well with the rest of the map, it doesn't matter. Remember at some point it's probably going to get changed by art.

                              2. When starting with a layout I will often try to focus on one solid room or area design. For example in DM-Chill it was the courtyard. It's easier for me to focus on making one room or area fun with some nice flow around a certain pickup, than it is for me to worry about every single part of the map at the same time. I will often still have an idea or 2 about how I can eventually grow it so that I don't work myself into a corner, but sometimes breaking down the map into chunks can make it much more manageable. This is especially true when you are first starting out at level design. As you get more comfortable and experienced it actually becomes easier to think about more parts of the level at the same time. Eventually with enough practice you end up like Sidney who can make really cool integrated areas of the map that flow nicely into each other.

                              3. In UT the weapons are everything. Think about the weapons, what are their ranges? what makes them have the advantage? what are their weaknesses? How does the area you're building in the map interact with them? One of the keys to designing a good map is supporting the main game elements which in UT is the weapons.

                              4. This might just be me being a dinosaur but don't use the scale tool with BSP. Vertex editing is much cleaner and safer. The cleaner and simpler your brushwork is, the easier it is to adapt and change your level based on feedback or direction changes.

                              5. When adding features to walls and areas such as door ways or columns, try to think about the spacing of them and how things are measured. If you can evenly space things out so that they are aesthetically pleasing and have unit measurements that aren't weird, it will be much easier to mesh later and you will save your self a lot of headaches. One of the mistakes I often see people make is to just throw different sized doorways and random windows and gaps into areas that don't add up that both make it much harder to mesh later as well as making the map in general feel less "designed". Remember that levels are built using modular sets which means the more measurements you reuse for things, the easier it will be to reuse assets for the map.

                              6. Don't make your walls too thin. Not only do they look weird but they will actually prove problematic down the road when you want to add meshes to your level. Often if I feel like I have a wall that is required to be too thin, it usually means I need to rethink/rework the area as a whole to make it fit better. When it comes to Unreal Tournament specifically, remember to think "chunky", especially with level shells in BSP. When it comes time to place meshes in those walls and create depth, you will need all of the space you can get!

                              7. Use some basic lighting to help define shapes and flow around the level. Lighting is such a great tool for helping people to learn a map faster by accenting paths and creating depth in the 3D space. It doesn't have to be really pretty but it should at least be functional. Something I've done in the past is to tweak the shades of the lighting even just slightly to create a different feel in certain areas of the map with pickups so that players can learn and more intuitively know where they are. It doesn't have to be drastic, even subtle differences will help. It's also not a bad idea to use different materials for your walls vs floors (even if they are just base colours) to help players better perceive the spaces and navigate the map.

                              8. Use blocking volumes to smooth out any edges or corners, especially in high traffic areas. No one likes to get snagged!

                              9. Try to give plenty of opportunities for players to track other players and cut them off in your flow. This creates fun cat and mouse game play. Use pickups as sound cues, especially things like health vials and ammo. The trick here is to make it feel like when you see an enemy go into a room/doorway/area, they generally only have 1-2 ways they could possibly end up which gives you the opportunity to cut them off and feel smart. If your map has enough of these then both players end up doing it to each other and you get some really interesting standoffs. This is something that I hope to go into more detail with down the road.

                              10. Too much elevation will create separate "fights" in an area because of visibility. This isn't always a bad thing and can be utilized to your advantage if that's the kind of game play you want to create but most of the time if you want to keep fights in a room together as one big fight, keep height change limited.

                              11. Try to add landmarks or some kind of identifier to each "Area" of the map. It doesn't have to be super unique or complicated... sometimes it can just be a simple column or wall feature, a window, a taller structure or tower extending past the roof of the level etc. It just has to be something that as players are moving through the level they can recognize it and know where they are. This helps them learn the map faster and makes it easier for them to communicate to other players. Sometimes it will also help you or an artist down the road interpret the space and create cool visuals for the level. Even in a shell this is important.

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