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How to clip a brush?

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    How to clip a brush?

    In past versions of Ued you were able to trim a brush down to just the portions that intersect/deintersect with other brushes. This was especially helpful for creating half cylinders etc. I can't seem to find that functionality in this version. Am I missing it somewhere or is it gone? If its gone, how does one go about the aforemention half-cylinder?

    Thanks

    #2
    Use Edit-Mode instead. There is still a brush clipping tool. Simply draw a line where you want to clip the brush and press apply!
    If you see me grinning, it's a disguise.
    If you see me grinning, don't trust my lies.
    When the ink dries, we'll have another masterpiece.
    When the drink dies, we'll have another restless sleep.

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      #3
      I, too, was a huge fan of brush clipping. However, last I checked the UT4 Editor has all sorts of problems with brush-clipped brushes creating annoying BSP holes, and I mean major BSP holes. I had to learn how to use the other Vertex editing tools to do the work that brush-clipping used to do for me in order to circumvent that, and it fixed the about 95% of the BSP hole problems.

      Basically, when you're in EDIT mode, you can select the brush, then select individual vertices and move them around, such as modifying two vertices on a box to create a parallelogram. It's often easier than brush clipping. You can also use that functionality to resize brushes, moving entire faces in/out. If you need more than 4 vertices, you double click on a side and press <SPLIT>. Then unclick it. Then select a vertice you want and skew it out a few units. Then select the other new vertice and skew it out a few units if you like. Then unclick. Then click the brush again and click <OPTIMIZE> so that the line between them goes away. (You might also be able to click the line and <delete> it.) You can also click on vertices and <delete> them too, if you like.

      Brush clipping in UT4 is a little clunky, btw. First go into EDIT. Then click the Brush Clip rotary. Then clip the brush you want to clip to highlight it. Then click where you want the first part of the brush clip point to be and press <Space>. Then click another point to create your brush clip line and click <Space>. Then you click <Split> or <Apply> (or some such) in the EDIT window to do the deed. Be cognizant that you might have to clip flip to flip the cutting edge, which will not flip it visually like it did in UT99.

      We could certainly use a video tutorial on the EDIT functions. Here's what can happen when you brush clip in the UT4 Editor. I have no idea why simply clipping that brush put a great big BSP hole in the floor. The brush had been clipped outside of the map, then moved over to that spot with the geometry then having been rebuilt. In UT99 it wasn't a problem and worked simply and seamlessly.

      Last edited by WHIPperSNAPper; 04-28-2015, 03:20 PM.
      UT4 CTF Maps: CTF-Whiplash | CTF-Sidewinder | CTF-Highpoint | CTF-Hardcore | CTF-Tubes-Of-Spam

      UT99 CTF Maps: CTF-DagnysBigAssMap-V2 | CTF-Dagnys-P****WhIpPeD | CTF-Dagnys-Dark-Delight-LE102 | CTF-Dagnys-Tubes-Of-Spam

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        #4
        If you need a trinagled brush you can still use the pen tool. It kinda works like the ShapeED from older versions of UnrealED. Clipping brushs cause exactly those problems WHIPperSNAPper mentioned. Try to avoid the clipping function. Right BSP-mapping is very annoying. Not only that you'll get BSP-holes in clipped brush ... you also will loose material-alignements if you use EDIT-mode!
        If you see me grinning, it's a disguise.
        If you see me grinning, don't trust my lies.
        When the ink dries, we'll have another masterpiece.
        When the drink dies, we'll have another restless sleep.

        Comment

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