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Acoustic simulation engine based on geometry and material descriptors

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    Acoustic simulation engine based on geometry and material descriptors

    The audio experience a game delivers for me is equally important than the visual experience. Sadly most games only show an evolution in the visual part of the game, not the audio part.
    The used principles are more or less the same for years now and only differs in the quality of the sound source and the used channels/3d-simulation.

    What I'd love to see for UT would be an audio engine which actually simulates the room acoustics in a realistic way based on the geometry and material descriptors.
    Such a audio engine should use CPU/GPU resources instead of special audio cards, to be usable for everyone.

    To get a better understanding of what I mean, you can check out the following links with examples and further descriptions:
    http://www.dsp.agh.edu.pl/en:resourc...v#.VPa87vnF-UZ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05EL5SumE_E#
    http://on-demand.gputechconf.com/gtc...-games-gpu.pdf

    More in-depth:
    http://publications.rwth-aachen.de/r...files/3875.pdf
    https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/50364

    One should not confuse this with EAX, as EAX uses pre-set reverberation algorithms (parametric approach).
    A similar principle was Aureal A3D, but never saw wide usage, as a expensive chip was required.

    IMO this could make UT stand out not only for its visuals, but also for its audio experience.

    PS. I know UT is in an early stage in development and only has a small team, but nevertheless I wanted to share that with you.

    #2
    I kind of agree with the comments that the multiplayer gameplay portion of the demonstration sounded a bit muddied, and made the action difficult to follow. It's a cool idea, don't get me wrong, but I think that realistic sound for realism's sake might not fit the bill for a competitive shooter.

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      #3
      Originally posted by supersoup View Post
      I kind of agree with the comments that the multiplayer gameplay portion of the demonstration sounded a bit muddied, and made the action difficult to follow. It's a cool idea, don't get me wrong, but I think that realistic sound for realism's sake might not fit the bill for a competitive shooter.
      I get your concerns, regarding a competitive game like UT which asks for consistency in every area.
      But in my opinion, its less about making the sound super realistic, than giving a great dynamic atmosphere. A great aural feedback on the gamer, has a really big impact and is most of the time underestimated.
      With the presented methods I think the immersive experience could be greatly enhanced, even for a game like UT. I does not necessarily be real-world realistic ...

      Further research on that topic showed that EPIC already (?) incorporated nVidia GameWorks into the Unreal Engine 4, which includes NVIDIA® OptiX™ Ray Tracing Engine. That engine could also be used to implement such acoustic simulations methods as proposed above, efficiently.
      Downside of this is clearly the exclusion of all AMD users out there ...

      I know that such a feature may be over the top for the base game, and even more looking at the current stage of development, but still I'd love see it in the future as an additional feature. Who knows, maybe this could be a community driven project
      Last edited by Danielito; 03-04-2015, 07:26 AM.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Danielito View Post
        ... giving a great dynamic atmosphere. A great aural feedback on the gamer, has a really big impact and is most of the time underestimated...
        ...
        +1 1
        The demo does sound a bit exaggerated and the effects are probably cranked up 200% for demo purposes. This feature is perfect for base game and most likely competitive game play too, (after some testing and being dialed in.)
        PS - I would be careful judging the quality of this technology, by recorded videos of unknown quality.

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